Science & Enterprise subscription

Follow us on Twitter

  • These Are Countries Where Startup Funding Is Really Taking Off https://t.co/qc8e3PSPGD via @crunchbasenews
    about 1 day ago
  • Now comes the hard part ... Artificial intelligence raises question of who’s an inventor https://t.co/tHDe9Rh6N4 vi… https://t.co/v9s3ZLgcN3
    about 1 day ago
  • Cashing out ... Gene therapy pioneer Kathy High has left Spark after completing $4.3B union with Roche ... via Endp… https://t.co/9wCsBVL2U2
    about 3 days ago
  • Amazon Care, the company's virtual medical clinic, is now live for Seattle employees https://t.co/yaXClfiY6K
    about 4 days ago
  • A survey of institutional investors shows these money managers for financial institutions are starting to take clim… https://t.co/jMNeawHlpR
    about 5 days ago

Please share Science & Enterprise

New Process Speeds 3-D Printing of Multiple Materials

Yong Chen

Yong Chen (Univ. of Southern California)

Engineers at University of Southern California in Los Angeles developed a new, faster technique for three-dimensional printing of objects made with multiple materials. Industrial engineering professor Yong Chen and colleagues from USC described their process yesterday at a meeting of the engineering organization ASME in San Diego.

Despite the promise and potential of 3-D printing and additive manufacturing, the fabrication of objects from multiple materials remains an obstacle, requiring hours to create a finished complex solid object from a digital model. Chen says his process that accommodates models needing materials of different properties can cut that time period to minutes.

Chen and colleagues adapted a process called  mask-image-projection-based stereolithography that slices a 3-D model into horizontal planes and converts each slice into a 2-D mask image. That image is then projected onto a photocurable liquid resin surface. When light is beamed on the resin, the resin is cured into the shape of the respective slice from the model.

In addition, Chen’s team enhanced the projection method, by adding a two-way movement design for layering the resin, to spread it faster in uniform layers. The researchers say in tests the process, they produced robotics and dental models in a few minutes.

Chen and colleagues are now looking into development of an automated design method when using multiple materials, as well as cutting the fabrication time even further. In the following video, Chen tells more about the enhanced 3-D printing process.

Read more:

*     *     *

 

Please share Science & Enterprise ...

Comments are closed.