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Patent Issued on Antibody for Brain, Spinal Cord Treatments

USPTO building (USPTO.gov)

(USPTO.gov)

Lpath Inc., a biotechnology company in San Diego, has been awarded a patent for its monoclonal antibody against lysophosphatidic acid, a factor in neurological disorders such as traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. Patent 8,158,124 was issued last week by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to four inventors, including Lpath’s chief scientist Roger Sabbadini, and assigned to Lpath Inc.

The company says lysophosphatidic acid is a contributing factor in a range of diseases including cancer, heart disease, and fibrosis, as well as macular degeneration, neuropathic pain, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. The patent covers antibody compositions in Lpath’s compound lpathomab that targets lysophosphatidic acid, and methods of binding those antibodies to lysophosphatidic acid.

Lpath says research by its staff and collaborators shows lpathomab protects against neural cell death in cases of traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. The findings indicate lpathomab helped reduce the size of traumatic brain injuries, and promoted improved behavioral functions for traumatic brain and spinal cord injury patients.

The company says tests on animals suggest as well that antibodies neutralizing lysophosphatidic acid can lead to decreases in collagen deposition and inflammation from fibrosis. Other tests with animals indicate antibodies in lpathomab can also reduce the growth of blood vessels that feed cancerous tumors.

Lpath’s technology generates antibodies targeting and binding to bioactive signaling lipids that are factors in a range of disorders. The company’s current drug candidates based on this technology address age-related macular degeneration and cancer.

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