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Lilly Acquiring Treatment for Autoimmune Disorders

(NIH)

19 March 2015. The pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly and Company is acquiring from Hanmi Pharmaceutical, an experimental drug that blocks the actions of an enzyme associated with rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. The deal can pay Hanmi, in Seoul, Korea, as much as $690 million.

Autoimmune disorders are diseases where the body’s . . . → Read More: Lilly Acquiring Treatment for Autoimmune Disorders

Laser Activation Tested as Potential Cancer Drug Delivery

Paras Prasad (University at Buffalo)

16 May 2014. Researchers from University at Buffalo in New York developed and tested in the lab a process harnessing lasers to activate drugs inside the body to kill cancer cells. Findings from the proof-of-concept study, led by Buffalo’s Paras Prasad with colleagues from universities in China and Korea, . . . → Read More: Laser Activation Tested as Potential Cancer Drug Delivery

Simple, Sensitive Biosensors Derived from Engineered Viruses

Seung-Wuk Lee (Univ of California, Berkeley)

Bioengineers at University of California in Berkeley developed a process for making sensors from genetically-engineered viruses simple enough to package in a smartphone app, yet can discriminate among volatile chemical vapors. The team from the lab of bioengineering professor Seung-Wuk Lee, with colleagues from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab . . . → Read More: Simple, Sensitive Biosensors Derived from Engineered Viruses

Gold Nanoparticles Configured into Stretchable Conductors

Sample of stretchable conductive material (Joseph Xu, University of Michigan)

Engineers and physicists at University of Michigan in Ann Arbor devised a method for transforming gold nanoparticles into conductive chains that stretch to nearly six times their original length and still conduct a current. The team led by Michigan chemical engineering professor Nicholas Kotov, . . . → Read More: Gold Nanoparticles Configured into Stretchable Conductors

Merck, Samsung to Collaborate on Biosimilars

(U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

The pharmaceutical company Merck & Co. in New Jersey and Samsung Bioepis Co. in Seoul, South Korea agreed on a deal for licensing and taking to market non-branded biologic therapies called biosimilars. While the companies released an outline of the financial arrangements, the dollar amount of the agreement was . . . → Read More: Merck, Samsung to Collaborate on Biosimilars

Antibiotic Found Effective On Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria (CDC)

Researchers in the U.S. and Korea found the antibiotic linezolid largely effective in treating patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, who had not responded to previous treatments. The findings of the team led by Clifton Barry of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of . . . → Read More: Antibiotic Found Effective On Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

Technique Devised for Controlling Graphene Nanopore Size

Moon Kim (University of Texas – Dallas)

Materials scientists at University of Texas in Dallas and Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology in Korea developed a process for making the size of nanopores in the material graphene small enough to read a single strand of DNA. The discovery is outlined in a recent issue . . . → Read More: Technique Devised for Controlling Graphene Nanopore Size

Luminous Nanoparticles Detectable Through Tissue Developed

Transmission electron microscopy image of nanoparticles designed for deep-tissue imaging. (Zhipeng Li, University at Buffalo)

Researchers in the U.S., Sweden, China, and Korea created illuminated nanoscale particles that can be detected through a 3.2 centimeter, or 1.26 inch layer of tissue. The team led by University at Buffalo, New York chemistry professor Paras Prasad . . . → Read More: Luminous Nanoparticles Detectable Through Tissue Developed

University Consortium to Research Nanotech Health Monitors

Veena Misra (North Carolina State Univ.)

North Carolina State University in Raleigh will lead a group of universities in the U.S., Australia, and Asia to develop self-powered health monitoring sensors and devices. Some 30 industry partners are expected to join the five-year, $18.5 million consortium, known as the Center for Advanced Self-Powered Systems of . . . → Read More: University Consortium to Research Nanotech Health Monitors

Technology Developed for Mass Wireless Chip Printing

Engineers in Korea developed a process for printing cheap electronic devices on every day items that can transmit data to smartphones. The work of the authors from Sunchon National University and Paru Printed Electronics Research Institute is described in the journal Nanotechnology (free registration required), published by Institute of Physics.

The team led by Jinsoo . . . → Read More: Technology Developed for Mass Wireless Chip Printing