Science & Enterprise subscription

Follow us on Twitter

  • Change the name of the Washington NFL team? A respondent to @joshtpm has a brilliant idea ... Washington Dukes, for… https://t.co/J9P4LKG2PT
    about 1 hour ago
  • A medical software team designed a mobile app that records and analyzes a person's sounds and sleep positions to de… https://t.co/NB99HQUWpC
    about 9 hours ago
  • New post on Science and Enterprise: Mobile App Screens for Sleep Apnea https://t.co/N8gTn2zWhe #Science #Business
    about 9 hours ago
  • Reported in Science & Enterprise on 6 May ... Coronavirus Testing the Cheap, Simple Way https://t.co/WqyoIhGjre
    about 13 hours ago
  • A company discovering therapeutic antibodies identified antibodies considered particularly effective in neutralizin… https://t.co/cHHeuebOv4
    about 1 day ago

Please share Science & Enterprise

Infographic – Immigrants Boost High-Value U.S. Start-Ups

Countries of immigrant start-ups

Origin of immigrant entrepreneurs starting new companies valued at $1 billion or more. Click on image for full-size view. (Statista)

2 June 2018. The Department of Homeland Security this week proposed ending the International Entrepreneur Rule that allows immigrant entrepreneurs to start new businesses in the U.S. The Trump administration’s crackdown on immigration, whether illegal or not, alarms our top universities where foreign-born researchers conduct much of their science, as we’ve reported in Science & Enterprise, and now that crackdown is being extended to people starting new businesses.

This weekend’s infographic, from our friends at Statista, shows the potential impact of this action. Based on data from 2016, about half — 44 of 87 — U.S. start-ups valued at $1 billion or more were founded by immigrants, with India providing the largest number of these entrepreneurs. The National Foundation for American Policy that prepared the report says each of these new enterprises creates some 760 jobs. While this issue may not have the emotional pull of other Trump immigration policies, it suggests factors other than good business sense are at work.

More from Science & Enterprise:

*     *     *

Please share Science & Enterprise ...

Comments are closed.