Science & Enterprise subscription

Follow us on Twitter

  • A collaboration between a research company and local health clinic chain is enabling customers at Walmart stores ac… https://t.co/NIGBm0fpw6
    about 9 hours ago
  • New post on Science and Enterprise: Clinical Research Sites Open in Canadian Walmart Stores https://t.co/M4gaJp2XgD #Science #Business
    about 9 hours ago
  • A high-powered binding protein, formulated as a gel and targeted by Crispr gene editing is shown in lab mice to pre… https://t.co/R71GYxRFBp
    about 13 hours ago
  • New post on Science and Enterprise: Gel, Crispr Help Defeat Cancer Drug Obstacles https://t.co/ebkkRP4G9g #Science #Business
    about 13 hours ago
  • Network to Promote Real-World Dementia Trials https://t.co/mGoQ8xRHJn
    about 15 hours ago

Please share Science & Enterprise

Infographic – Harvard or Stanford? Venture Capitalists Revealed.

Venture capitalist demographics

Venture capitalist demographics, July 2018. Click on image for full-size view. (Statista)

4 August 2018. A continuing and popular topic at Science & Enterprise is venture capital, a key source of financing for science-based start-ups and other new companies in the tech industries. Our reporting on venture capital, much like other business media, tells about the companies investing in early-stage enterprises, but what about the people in the industry?

Our friends at Statista published a chart yesterday about people called venture capitalists, or VCs, from data compiled by Richard Kerby, a partner in the venture capital investment company Equal Ventures, that appeared earlier this week on Medium, this weekend’s infographic. Kerby compared the demographic backgrounds of VCs in July 2018 compared to 2016, and found these investors continue to be largely white and Asian, and slightly more female than in 2016.

But this time, Kerby looked into one more factor: where did VCs go to school? His results show 4 out of 10 venture capital executives or associates attended either Harvard University or Stanford University for at least one of their degrees. Thus only two institutions produce nearly half of today’s venture capital investors. He calls this situation a “mirrortocracy” rather than a meritocracy, and says it contributes to a narrow perspective that makes the industry more, not less, insular.

You can find Kerby’s database of some 1,500 VCs online. For the record, I got a graduate degree at Boston University. It wasn’t Harvard, but I could see it from Boston U.

More from Science & Enterprise:

*     *     *

Please share Science & Enterprise ...
error

1 comment to Infographic – Harvard or Stanford? Venture Capitalists Revealed.