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Infographic — International Space Station Crew Members

Chart: visitors to ISS

Click on image for full-size view. (NASA, Statista)

6 Oct. 2018. Space travel has captivated our imaginations for centuries, and the International Space Station circling the earth represents a continuing laboratory for learning more about humans living in space. In addition, the ISS shows how people from different nations and cultures can collaborate toward a common goal, a lesson for which the world needs an occasional reminder.

Yesterday, our friends at Statista published a chart showing the nations represented among ISS crew members since it become operational, our infographic for this weekend. Data for this chart were collected by NASA earlier this year. The U.S. sent the most crew members so far, followed by Russia, Japan, and Canada.

We report from time to time on work going on at the ISS, mainly biomedical experiments, with a few recent links from Science & Enterprise given below.

More from Science & Enterprise:

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