Science & Enterprise subscription

Follow us on Twitter

  • Many thanks @SciSeeker https://t.co/uQy4yl5pQb
    about 3 hours ago
  • New post on Science and Enterprise: Taking a Break https://t.co/QgH851GMZX #Science #Business
    about 4 days ago
  • Total venture capital funding in the U.S. for first six months of 2019 reached levels not seen since the year 2000,… https://t.co/cGSC6j1Xl8
    about 4 days ago
  • New post on Science and Enterprise: Infographic – U.S. Venture Funds Near 20-Year Highs https://t.co/mIkraoGRAH #Science #Business
    about 4 days ago
  • A set of computational tools developed at Purdue University enables public safety agencies to monitor potentially c… https://t.co/NHSLm9YBBG
    about 5 days ago

Please share Science & Enterprise

Infographic – Robotics Effects on Job Markets

Robotics job impact

Click on image for full-size view. (Statista)

6 July 2019. While robotics coupled with artificial intelligence are expected to boost productivity and even disrupt entire industries, those technologies are also expected to transform the way individuals do their jobs. Economists are struggling with gauging these impacts and governments are struggling as well with framing policies that encourage innovation, but still protect individual workers and families from collapsing job markets.

Our friends at Statista published a chart this week reporting on expectations of major companies on job markets, this weekend’s infographic on Science & Enterprise. The data, from a survey of executives at more than 1,300 global companies done earlier this year by Boston Consulting Group, show many of these managers expect robotics to reduce employee head counts, but the percentages vary sharply by country.

About two-thirds (67%) of Chinese executives anticipate robotics to reduce their numbers of employees, about twice the percentage of managers in Italy (34%). From 50 to 60 percent of executives in Poland, Japan, Canada, Mexico, and the U.S. also expect staff reductions of some magnitude. Less than half of the executives in the U.K., Germany, Austria, India, and France, as well as Italy, anticipate fewer jobs resulting from robotics.

More from Science & Enterprise:

*     *     *

Please share Science & Enterprise ...
error

Comments are closed.