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Infographic – Trust Varies in Facial Recognition Use

Trust in Facial Recognition

Click on image for full-size view. (Pew Research Center)

7 Sept. 2019. Americans overall express at least some trust about facial recognition use by law enforcement, but less confidence when used by businesses or employers. These findings are part of a report released this week by the Pew Research Center, and this weekend’s infographic on Science & Enterprise.

The Pew researchers find more than half of American adults (56%) trust law enforcement agencies somewhat or a great deal to use facial recognition, a form of computer vision and artificial intelligence, responsibly. Fewer than 4 in 10 Americans however, (36%) have at least some trust in technology companies, and barely 1 in 5 (18%) express any trust in advertisers to responsibly use the technology.

When asked if facial recognition is acceptable by these entities, about 6 in 10 Americans (59%) say the technology is acceptable for law enforcement, compared to 15 percent for advertisers. For apartment landlords who use facial recognition to track people who enter and leave their buildings, those with an opinion are split, 36 to 34 percent — acceptable versus unacceptable — but more Americans (41%) disapprove of facial recognition to track employee attendance, compared to 30 percent who say it’s acceptable.

The Pew survey team interviewed a representative sample of 4,272 adults in the U.S. from 3 to 17 June 2019.

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