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Infographic – China Remains Top U.S. Student Source

Chart: international students

Click on image for full-size view. (Statista)

23 Nov. 2019. Even casual readers of Science & Enterprise will notice that many of the faculty, postdocs, and students in our stories about U.S. academic labs come from someplace else. Our friends at Statista this week show the countries from where foreign students on U.S. campuses originated in the 2018-19 academic year, this weekend’s infographic.

The chart’s data come from the annual Open Doors report issued by the Institute of International Education and the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. The report says 1.1 million students from outside the U.S. attended colleges and universities in the U.S. last year, about the same number as the previous year, making up 5.5 percent of this country’s total academic student enrollment. Citing data from Department of Commerce, the report notes that international students contributed some $44.7 billion to the U.S. economy.

China continues to provide the largest number of international students on American campuses, sending more than 369,000 of its citizens, an increase of almost 2 percent over the previous year. India ranks second with about 202,000 students, a 3 percent increase. South Korea, Saudi Arabia, and Canada occupy ranks 3, 4, and 5, although the number of South Korean students declined by 4 percent, and Saudi students fell sharply, by 16.5 percent from the previous year.

Science, math, and engineering disciplines drew just over half (51.6%) of international students, with mathematics and computer science students increasing by 9.4 percent, making it the second-largest field of study. Engineering remains the discipline drawing the most international students, accounting for more than one in five (21.1%) students.

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