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Infographic – Americans Support Sending Vaccines Abroad

Chart: Sending vaccines abroad

Click on image for full-size view (YouGov)

22 May 2021. About two in three Americans are in favor of the U.S. sending Covid-19 vaccine doses to other countries where infections remain a problem. Those findings are reported by the survey research company YouGov in a recent online poll of adults in the U.S., in conjunction with Yahoo News.

The poll results show 65 percent of respondents are in favor of “the U.S. government sending vaccine doses to other countries where infections are surging,” with 13 percent opposed, and 22 percent not sure. Approval of the U.S. sending vaccines overseas where needed is also supported by majorities across the political spectrum. Democrats are most likely to favor this policy, with nearly eight in 10 (78%) approving, but nearly six in 10 Republicans (58%) also approve, as do two-thirds (65%) of independents.

Likewise, those who received or plan to get a Covid-19 shot are more likely to approve of this policy. Some eight in 10 (79%) of fully vaccinated Americans support sending vaccine doses overseas where needed, while six in 10 to two-thirds of those partially vaccinated or planning to get the vaccine also approve. On the other hand, less than half, 45 to 46 percent, of Americans who say they will not get vaccinated or are unsure about getting the vaccine approve of sending vaccines abroad. Nonetheless, only two in 10 or fewer of these groups are outright opposed to the policy.

YouGov conducted the online poll among 1,561 adults in the U.S. from 13 to 22 May. Participants were selected from YouGov’s opt-in panel, which the company says is representative of the U.S. population, and weighted by U.S. Census demographic data, participation in the 2020 presidential election, and voter registration. The findings have a confidence interval, sometimes called margin-of-error, of about 2.6 percent.

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