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Biotech Licenses Natural Anti-Bacterial Compounds

Fungi samples in test tubes (Agricultural Research Service/USDA)

(Agricultural Research Service/USDA)

AMRI, a biotechnology company in Albany, New York agreed to a research and licensing deal with Genentech, a Roche Group company, for AMRI’s anti-bacterial compounds from its natural products sample collection.

Under the agreement, Genentech will receive an exclusive license to develop and commercialize potential products from AMRI’s anti-bacterial program. AMRI will also collaborate with Genentech to identify new anti-bacterial agents.

In addition to an upfront license fee and research funding, AMRI will be eligible for development regulatory milestones and receive royalties from Genentech on worldwide sales of any resulting commercialized compounds. The companies did not disclose either a dollar amount or time period for the deal.

AMRI says its natural product libraries has some 300,000 screening wells of crude extracts and prefractionated product samples derived from marine and terrestrial microorganisms and plants. This collection, says AMRI, offers a diversity of leads not typically found in synthetic chemical libraries.

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