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Infographic – Fastest Job Growth Seen in Health, Tech

Infographic: The Occupations Growing The Fastest Since The Recession | Statista
You will find more infographics at Statista

24 March 2018. Job creation is a good indicator of the state of the economy and its various sectors. We report on business developments in areas affected by science that includes many aspects of health care and information technology, and which according to a chart released this week by Statista account for the jobs with the fastest growth in the U.S. during the past 10 years, this weekend’s infographic.

The chart, with data from CareerBuilder, shows the fastest growing job category is home health aides, nearly 300,000, likely a result of the growing population of older individuals in the U.S. But growth by the next few job categories — web developers, veterinary technicians, genetic counselors, and health technicians — is probably due to a number of factors, including investment in new technologies.

Among genetic counselors, only about 700 more of these jobs were created, but that represents a 31 percent increase since 2007. As our story yesterday in Science & Enterprise points out, the need for specialists to interpret the results from the growing use of genetic testing is only likely to grow even more.

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