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Non-Invasive Hemoglobin Anemia Screening System Unveiled

Red blood cell (science360.gov)

Red blood cell (science360.gov)

OrSense Ltd., a medical device developer in Israel, has introduced a wireless, non-invasive hemoglobin measurement system for anemia monitoring, hemorrhage detection, and pre-donation blood screening. The company revealed the new product at a meeting of the International Society of Blood Transfusion in Cancun, Mexico.

Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. Hospitals and blood donation centers require hemoglobin measurements to protect against blood with low hemoglobin, such as from people with anemia, from entering the supply chain. Most current tests require the physical drawing of blood, which can be painful for some patients or difficult in emergencies.

OrSense’s new device, called Glasswing, is a wireless system that can take continuous or occasional hemoglobin measurements from a patient without drawing blood. The system uses an optical ring-shaped sensor that goes on a patient’s finger. The sensor applies gentle pressure to the patient’s finger, slightly restricting blood flow, which allows for optical measurements of blood properties, including hemoglobin counts.

The Glasswing system then collects the data for online storage or downloading. The company says the data can be transferred in real time to electronic medical records or digitally-enabled monitoring systems in primary care offices, critical care and emergency facilities, blood donation centers, women’s health clinics, and home health care providers.

OrSense says the system offers other advantages, notably reduced need for trained staff to take measurements, and the absence of bio-hazardous waste associated with the drawing of blood for traditional hemoglobin tests.

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